BOOKS: "Life After Death Row: Exonerees’ Search for Community and Identity"

A new book by Professors Saundra Westervelt and Kimberly Cook looks during a lives of eighteen people who had been wrongfully condemned to genocide and who were after liberated from genocide row. In Life After Death Row: Exonerees’ Search for Community and Identity, a authors concentration on 3 executive areas inspiring those who had to start a new life after withdrawal years of serious confinement: a ostensible invisibility of these people after their release; a complicity of a probity complement in permitting that invisibility; and a need for any of them to confront their personal trauma. C. Ronald Huff, a highbrow during a University of California, Irvine, noted, “The authors decently control a tour inside a minds of exonerees, permitting readers to see a universe from their singular perspectives.”

Saundra D. Westervelt is an associate highbrow of sociology during a University of North Carolina Greensboro. Kimberly J. Cook is highbrow and chair of a dialect of sociology and criminology during a University of North Carolina Wilmington.

(S. Westervelt and K. Cook, “Life After Death Row: Exonerees’ Search for Community and Identity,” Rutgers University Press, stirring Sep 2012).  See Death Row and Innocence.  Read some-more books on a genocide penalty.  Listen to DPIC’s podcasts on Death Row and on Innocence.

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