Aggression Replacement Training (ART) for Adolescents in a Runaway Shelter

Evidence Rating:
Promising – One investigate Promising - One study

Program Goals
The Aggression Replacement Training (ART) module combines anger-control training, amicable skills training, and dignified logic preparation that is designed to change a function of chronically assertive teenagers with eremitic function (ASB) problems. The idea of a module is to revoke charge and assault among girl by providing them with opportunities to learn prosocial skills, control indignant impulses, and conclude a perspectives of others.

Target Population
The precipitated ART curriculum was targeted during teenagers who were temporarily vital in a short-term residential trickery (a exile shelter) and had exhibited signs of ASB. Youth in exile shelters are typically during high risk of carrying been unprotected to violence, and there is an organisation between childhood assault bearing and ASB problems seen in teenagers (Wilson, Stover, and Berkowitz 2009).

Program Theory
The module relied on repeated training and send training techniques to learn participants to control buoyancy and annoy so they could select to use some-more suitable prosocial behaviors. In addition, guided organisation contention was used to scold eremitic thinking.

Program Components
The ART module is customarily implemented over a duration of 10 to 24 weeks. However, a module was precipitated into 15-days and delivered to teenagers over a 21-day time period. The teenagers were vital in a exile preserve and showed signs of ASB problems, that included: violations of a manners of a shelter, violations of authorised or amicable norms, violations of another person’s personal property, and charge toward another person’s earthy or tension well-being. The precipitated chronicle of a ART module enclosed a anger-control training and amicable skills training components of a unchanging curriculum, though did not embody any of a dignified logic education.

All teenagers vital in a exile preserve participated in one skills-training organisation any day, with organisation meetings durability between 1 and 1½ hours. Group leaders relied on specific chapters from a diagnosis manuals from Goldstein and Glick (1987) to exercise a precipitated curriculum. The 15-day sequences of organisation topics enclosed annoy arousal, self-recognition of annoy and a use of annoy reduction, annoy triggers, how to demonstrate a complaint, a use of self-instruction, how to conflict organisation pressure, self-evaluation, material thinking, how to respond to a annoy of others, a indignant function cycle, how to keep out of fights, operation of a gull anger-control ability set, how to understanding with an accusation, empathy, and a examination of all a skills taught.

Groups sizes ranged from about 7 to 10 adolescents, and a organisation leaders were staff of a preserve that had been lerned to control a precipitated ART curriculum.

Evaluation Outcomes

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Daily Rate of ASB Incidents

The interrupted time array research conducted by Nugent, Bruley, and Allen (1998) found a 20 percent rebate in a rate of eremitic function (ASB) incidents per customer any week. The pretreatment daily rate of ASB was about 0.50, that translates to about one ASB occurrence per customer any 2 days or about 3.5 incidents per customer any week. Implementation of a precipitated Aggression Replacement Training (ART) module was compared with a statistically poignant diminution in a daily rate of ASB to about 2.8 incidents per customer any week.

Number of ASB Incidents
The pretreatment normal array of ASB incidents per day was about 6.4. During a diagnosis phase, a normal daily array of ASB incidents was about 5.3, clarification a doing of a ART module was compared with a statistically poignant rebate of about 1.1 ASB incidents per day. This rebate represents a diminution in a normal array of daily ASB incidents of about 17.2 percent.

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Evaluation Methodology

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Nugent, Bruley, and Allen (1998) examined a efficacy of a precipitated chronicle of a Aggression Replacement Training (ART) module on a eremitic function (ASB) of teenagers vital in a exile preserve in that a normal length of stay was about 3 weeks. Data on ASB incidents during a trickery was collected over a duration of 519 days, regulating a preference representation of 522 adolescents. The representation of teenagers had an normal age of 14.9 years. Over a march of a investigate period, there was a daily meant array of 13 teenagers in a facility. The meant array of boys any day was 7.3 and a daily meant array of girls was 5.7. About 77 percent of a teenagers were white, 18.4 percent were African American, 2.5 percent were Latino, 0.4 percent were Asian, and a residue were from other minority groups.

There were dual primary outcome measures of interest: a daily rate of ASB of teenagers staying in a preserve and a daily array of ASB incidents of youth in a shelter. An ASB occurrence was tangible as any function available in a proprietor adolescent’s box record that would be deliberate to be: (1) a defilement of manners and/or behavioral discipline of a shelter; (2) a defilement of authorised or amicable norms; (3) a defilement of another person’s personal property; or (4) charge toward another person’s earthy or romantic well-being. The daily rate of ASB was tangible as a array of ASB incidents per proprietor youth on a given day. The daily array of ASB incidents was tangible as a sum array of ASB incidents occurring on a given day. The daily rate index takes into comment a array of teenagers in a shelter, given a daily array does not.

The investigate used an interrupted time array design. The pattern used a pretreatment daily measures of ASB as a control to review a successive daily measures performed during treatment. Data on adolescents’ ASB was collected for a 310-day duration (about 10 months) before doing of a shortened ART curriculum. Data was afterwards collected for a 209-day duration (about 7 months) after a module was implemented.

The investigate used autoregressive integrated relocating normal (ARIMA) time array research procedures to exam a outcome of implementing a module in a shelter. There were dual hypotheses tested: (1) there will be a diminution in a daily rate of ASB of teenagers in a preserve consequent with a doing of a ART program; and (2) there will be a diminution in a daily array of ASB incidents of youth in a preserve consequent with a doing of a ART program. Both hypotheses were tested in on-tailed statistical stress tests.

However, there are several methodological stipulations to this approach. First, given a investigate did not use an initial design, inferences of causality contingency be done with counsel since some threats to inner effect were not controlled. For example, it is probable that preserve staff might have unknowingly altered their definitions of ASB during a ART proviso of a investigate since they were taught how to control a module shortly before it was implemented. The believe gained during a ART training might have altered staff members’ clarification and notice of ASB incidents. In addition, there were a array of variables representing a daily sourroundings of a preserve (such as a array of boys and girls vital in a shelter) that were wanting from a study. It is probable these energetic factors might have shabby a daily rates and numbers of ASB incidents in a shelter.

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Cost

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Implementation Information

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Evidence-Base (Studies Reviewed)

top borderThese sources were used in a growth of a module profile:

Study 1
Nugent, William R., Charlene Bruley, and Patricia Allen. 1998. “The Effects of Aggression Replacement Training on Antisocial Behavior in a Runaway Shelter.” Research on Social Work Practice 8(6):636–56.

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Additional References

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Goldstein, A. and B. Glick. 1987. Aggression Replacement Training. Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Nugent, William R., Charlene Bruley, and Patricia Allen. 1999. “The Effects of Aggression Replacement Training on Male and Female Antisocial Behavior in a Runaway Shelter.” Research on Social Work Practice 9(4):466–82.

Wilson, Helen W., Carla Smith Stover, and Steven K. Berkowitz. 2009. “Research Review: The Relationship Between Childhood Violence Exposure and Juvenile Antisocial Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Review.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 50(7):769–79.

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